Kukri, Large, Handle, Re-Making

Modification of the Ceremonial Kukri Handle.

April, 2005

Source first, then article.  Handle is pretty as purchased, but the large knife is too heavy to swing with one hand, and the handle is too small for both hands, as purchased.

 

This is a rough, first draft of the notes on the modification. Saturday, April 26, 2005.  At the time of this writing, the handle has not gone through final shaping.

Pictures of the Ceremonial Kukri Handle Near Completion

 

#500448 GIGANTIC CEREMONIAL KUKRI
Made by the government contractor Windlass Steelcrafts. Hand forged from high carbon steel. Each comes with regulation sheath. Beheads water buffaloes with a single stroke for the traditional Gurkha sacred ceremony. Very scarce! Only one issued to each Gurkha Regiment in India. Specially carved native hardwood handle.

 Polished steel blade is a staggering 3/8" thick and more than 2 1/2 feet long. Weighs 4 lbs. 6 oz.

MEASUREMENTS:
Blade- 2 1/2 feet long, 3/8" thick
Wt. 4lbs 6 oz.

Price:  $63.00 (Excluding: FL Sales Tax at 6%)


 





 

This is a lifted section from

http://www.by-the-sword.com/acatalog/Standard_Knives_Page_4.html 

To Purchase, follow the above link.  Paul.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Shipping info   http://www.by-the-sword.com/new/shipping.htm

Call toll free at:   877-433-9368
Or fax your order to:   239-433-9128
To Contact: http://www.by-the-sword.com/new/contact.htm

Home Page:  http://www.by-the-sword.com/new/index.html

-------------------------------

Modification of the Ceremonial Kukri Handle.  April, 2005

 

MEASUREMENTS:
Blade- 2 1/2 feet long, 3/8" thick
Wt. 4 lbs 6 oz.
 

I will give you some scans, but first let us write it up.  Came by revelation from the LORD.

Blade was of the capped-handle method.  The front part of the handle was held by a cap, behind the last part of the blade.  Metal ran entirely through the handle, "like sticking your finger into a pie,"  and was braded off at the base, after an anterior cap of metal was added.

In the following picture the shape of the metal can be seen as the smallest, interior shape   drawn, with the large side to the right.  The blade was flat at this end, and it got smaller until it was shaped into a tube, at the capped base.  Blue area is my first guess at what the handle shape was going to be.  The dark line is the approximate size of the oaken blocks the handle was made from.  Approximate length, before final shaping, of the blocks was more like 10 3\4 inches.

If you print the picture linked here  on one page, you will have reproduced the original of the sketch shown in part, above.

Two oaken wood blocks, about 2  3\4 inches, by 10 3\4 inches, 5\8 inches thick, were obtained from work.  One interior block, of 5 \16 inches, of ash, was obtained.

The thin ash block was laid down, and the shape of the metal shown above was traced on to it.  Thereupon it was cut out, and glued on to one of the oaken blocks, with waterproof woodworkers glue, and allowed to set, over night.

The metal was bedded further, with the black epoxy I like, and clamped down.

With the metal of the blade, inside the handle visible, with the whole kukri attached, I could "see" the shape I wanted the handle to take.  The next day, the half-handle was cut to shape with a jig saw, and the holes for the brass bolts were drilled. 

I then traced the rough shape of the handle on to the other half of the handle, the second oaken block, and cut it out.  Waterproof wood-workers glue was applied to that block, and I drilled through the holes already on the first half of the handle, on to the second.

The two halves of the handles were clamped together in order to do this.  After the first hole was drilled, I applied the brass bolt and tightened it down.  The clamp on that side began to loosen up.  Applying all the brass bolts fully tightened the handle parts to the metal.

Brass bolts were removed, again, so that the wood could be worked.  Setting and recessing them will come later. 

This is a rough, first draft of the notes on the modification. Saturday, April 26, 2005.  At the time of this writing, the handle has not gone through final shaping.  Some intermediate pictures will follow.

There are many pictures to follow.  They will be labeled in stages only to match with others at the same degree of working.  Open your browser to F11, Full Screen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the above picture you can see where I have used a grinder and a belt sander to rough-shape.  Bolts are obviously removed.  A one-handed or two-handed stance is what is aimed for.

 

 

Handle is getting rounder, worked with a four-inch grinder, after the blade edge is taped, as noted in second picture, below.  Always wear gloves, and tape the edge of a kukri, if you are working the handle.  This vital tool, and weapon, if uncontrolled, WILL  HURT YOU. 

----------------

The handle is now shaping up.

------------------------------

Next photo takes a first look at the "sandwiched wood."

Here you can see the sandwiched wood, though photo was back at stage one.  The black at the front is epoxy, bedding the blade, where the handle was extended up on to it. 

 

 

LARGE VIEWS OF THE KUKRI         2' 6" LONG, (30 INCHES)

The handle is something over ten-inches long.  Stage is at the first one, pictured above. 

In this picture the handle is more rounded.  In my own method, working outdoors, I use a 4-inch grinder to rough-shape the wood. 

Note the tape.  A kukri has a razor-sharp edged blade.  You can easily cut yourself if you do not protect yourself.  Even with the tape, I handle the blade as if it were razor sharp, and unprotected.

This is a rough, first draft of the notes on the modification. Saturday, April 26, 2005.  At the time of this writing, the handle has not gone through final shaping.  Some intermediate pictures will follow.

Friday, May 20th, 2005.  Work waited a month.  Projects like this are more fun if done when you have the time and the inclination.  Since there are so many pictures, and there are "more to come,"  I am extending this to a second page, for those on the net.

Pictures of the Ceremonial Kukri Handle Near Completion

 

Original Ceremonial Kukri Evaluation

Source for this knife from "By The Sword"

Another short article on what I think is the best handle shape for a Kukri.

 

Page 2 of this Article